Category Archives: Lifestyle

Is Sleep Better Than A Pay Rise?

A survey carried out by the Oxford Economics and National Centre for Social Research has found that gaining enough sleep is the key for living well. The study showed that income has little effect on how well people felt, with a mere 50% pay rise elevating the wellbeing rate by just half a percent!

For the average individual, an improvement in sleep is equivalent to a pay rise up to four times. The researchers asked over 8000 people about different areas of their lives including how situations affected them and how they behaved as a result. This is a continuous study and subjects will be interviewed every 6 months, enabling the researchers to track the effects of different lifestyles.

Silent Nights is a proven method for increasing both the length by 66% and enhancing quality of sleep.

 

The Real Relationship Between Bacteria and Inflammation

It is looking possible that brain inflammation could be altered by bacteria in our microbiome – this is according to new research carried out at the University of Colorado Boulder. This suggests that one particular bacteria could have an anti-inflammatory effect on the brain. The study was carried out on rodents and it was found that the bacterium – mycobacterium vaccae – actually shifts the brain towards a state of anti-inflammation. Although much work is still required in order to develop this further, it’s sure to make you excited for the future of science! In the meantime, both Glutathione and Aeon are proven ways to manage inflammation and protect the body from the accumulation of inflammatory chemicals.

Stress reduction for a better quality of life

A massive study spanning 30 years of data and examining a cohort of over one million people has found a strong association between persons suffering from stress disorders, including PTSD, and an increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases such as arthritis and Crohn’s disease.

 

The striking results found that those suffering from a diagnosed stress-related disorder were 30 to 40 percent more likely to subsequently be diagnosed with one of 41 different autoimmune diseases. These autoimmune diseases included rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohn’s disease and celiac disease.

The full article can be viewed here:

https://newatlas.com/stress-autoimmune-disease-ptsd/55109/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2018-06-20%20144042%20USA%20Daily%20Basic%202018-06-20%20145042%20Connection%20between%20stress%20and%20autoimmune%20disease%20affirmed%20by%2030-year%20study&utm_content=2018-06-20%20144042%20USA%20Daily%20Basic%202018-06-20%20145042%20Connection%20between%20stress%20and%20autoimmune%20disease%20affirmed%20by%2030-year%20study+CID_52be13bf1d455db0378861f49343407f&utm_source=Campaign%20Monitor&utm_term=Read%20more

We have always promoted our Y-Age Aeon patch for stress reduction for a better quality of life, as well as a longer life.  Now here is more scientific evidence as to why stress reduction is good for everyone.

 

What are Stem Cells and why are they important?

A stem cell is an undifferentiated cell of a multicellular organism that is capable of giving rise to indefinitely more cells of the same type, and from which certain other kinds of cells arise by differentiation.

Stem cells develop into many different cell types in the body and are part of the bodies repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells.

Stem cells are important for many reasons – They give rise to the entire body, including all of the many specialized cell types and organs such as the heart, lungs, skin, sperm, eggs and other tissues. In some adult tissues, such as bone marrow, muscle, and brain, discrete populations of adult stem cells generate replacements for cells that are lost through normal wear and tear, injury, or disease.

Research on stem cells continues to advance knowledge about how an organism develops from a single cell and how healthy cells replace damaged cells in adult organisms.

The new X39 patch is designed to elevate a peptide that activates stem cells.  To learn more, please listen to the webinar on X39 on our youtube channel HERE.

Our Consumption Impacts Our Mood

Our bodies are influenced by what we put into our bodies, but how does following a healthy diet affect our mood, and can good nutritional food have an impact on depression rates?

A new study carried out at Rush University Medical Center has found that following a balanced, healthy diet has not only confirmed lower levels of depression, but also a lower risk of hypertension.

The DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) was created with the aim to lower blood pressure without the use of medications! Much of this diet is made up to consuming natural foods – plenty of fruit and veg, grains and low-fat dairy.

This research carried out over six years following over 950 people, observing symptoms of depression and looking closely at the subjects diets, the finding was remarkable as those who followed the DASH diet were amongst the lowest group likely to suffer from depression.

Although the author of the study does point out that the diet does not confirm reduction in depression however the study does lead to the inevitable question as to whether or not a bad diet does make individuals feel worse if they follow a bad diet.

A trial carried out by Deakin University researched whether or not following a natural diet could help a person with depression, 67 people diagnosed with major depressive disorder were broken into two groups. Group number one were given a Mediterranean style diet to follow, whilst the second group were given a structured support program, commonly used for people with depression.

After 12 weeks the results came back showing that 1/3 of the individuals following the diet were confirmed to have entered remission for depression. That is compared to 8% of the social support group following that program, with those heeding the diet benefiting the greatest to depressive symptoms.

Although it is yet to be confirmed if an unhealthy diet causes depression, the long-term health implications of following a well-balanced diet are in no doubt.